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Name:Danebury Hill
Hill number:18521
Height:143m / 469ft
Parent (Ma):2906  Walbury Hill
RHB Section:42: South-East England & the Isle of Wight
County/UA:Hampshire (CoU)
Catchment:Test
Class:Tump (100-199m)
(Tu,1)
Grid ref:SU 32301 37671
Summit feature:no feature
Drop:60m
Col:83m  SU324392  
OS map sheet(s):(1:50k) 185
(1:25k) 131S
GPS data:show GPS entries for this hill

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N.B. Some hill summits are on private property or on land where there is no public right of way.  Permission should be sought from the landowner where access to a hill summit is through private land.
Please report via the contact page any logs you see below which describe or encourage acts of trespass, and mention the hill number and hill name.

Logged Descriptions  (logged by 22 users)ByDate of Ascent
From the lower car park- great hill fortMark Sims25/05/2018
I wonder what additions to this most studied iron age fort in Europe we are leaving behind for future archaeologists to puzzle over in 2000 years time? Perhaps preserved imprints of dog footprints of all sizes (it was dog walking central on my visit); and the odd wayward plastic poo bag no doubt? Maybe some remains of the flushing loo block used by us humans - fascinating. An overflowing litter bin - a future Pandora's box of intrigue? And the puzzling remains of a small concrete mini pyramid (aka a trig pillar) surrounded by eroded ground, caused it will be assumed, by pilgrims coming from far and wide to touch it - whatever for? Spiritual enlightenment perhaps? A hill bagging theory will no doubt be scoffed at as nonsensical, unless a diligent researcher of the future discovers this ancient website from the primitive internet age. And to confound it the trig is not even on the highest point. And then of course what will they leave behind...?Chris Pearson05/12/2016
From the lower car park. Summit near clump of trees. Interesting area.Herbert Anchovy23/05/2016
cycling back to Winchester from Hungerford CTC Easter holidayTeasyChris07/04/2015
Walked up from car park, past trig pillar to hill fort summit area. Natural high ground with reasonably obvious summit mound. Good views east, all other areas obscured by surrounding trees.jonglew14/01/2015
On my grand tour of Britain, I visited this lovely hillfort with my friend Soesen, and had a picnic! Museum of the Iron Age in Andover is worth looking at for context after, if it still exists.DanHolme04/02/2005
RHW07/09/2002
been up their lotsTerra Love01/01/1994
andrew brown28/10/2018
PGCE10/04/2017
bwm17/03/2017
Cullann01/11/2016
Adrian28/11/2010
stevent080902/01/2009
Hillsidenick25/07/2007
Jacqdaw25/05/2007
Dusty14/05/2006
BrianMatthews07/01/2005
rbayfield14/12/2003
fasgadh19/08/2003
RichardPH01/04/2000
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